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For more than a hundred years, motion pictures were shown at movie theaters using physical analog film. These films were run by professional projectionists, who spooled out 35mm movie memories high above the crowds from the hidden world of the film projection booth. 

Over the last several years, the widespread conversion of movie theaters from film to digital projection has ushered in a new era of motion picture exhibition, and the classic 35mm film projection booth has quietly changed forever.

It is a world that remained largely unseen for the century it existed, and is now all but gone…

Come along for a journey into the film projection booth. Experience the magic of this lost world, and discover the hidden finger print it left behind: The Cue Dot.

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I’m a filmmaker and designer who started out as a film projectionist back when I was in art school at the Rhode Island School of Design.

I projected films professionally for many years as a way of supporting my early filmmaking and creative endeavors.

 

When I learned the theater I worked at was going to convert from film to digital projection, I put my other projects on hold and embarked on a massive endeavor to capture the projection booth in all its detail, across multiple mediums…

 

The Cue Dot • Phase #1

Last summer, I opened my time capsule of material and began sharing the first phase of this project, telling the story of the projection booth across multiple platforms:

Among the many people who have connected with this project are fellow filmmakers, photographers, film enthusiasts, projectionists, cinephiles, film archivists and movie lovers.

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The Cue Dot • Phase #2

Last fall, the growing support for The Cue Dot allowed me to unlock the second phase of this project:

Special Edition Archival Giclée Prints

Shop the Collection

These prints are made with some of the finest archival materials and are rated to last more than a hundred years when carefully kept. There are more than 50 individual photographs to choose from in the collection:

Pick Your Favorites

I personally supervise the printing and worldwide shipping of all of my photography to make sure the vision and quality is maintained throughout:

These 18 x 24″ and 24 x 36″ contact sheet style prints are made with the same high-quality archival stock as the rest of the special edition giclée prints, and are a great way to enjoy the whole series:

The Cue Dot • Contact Sheet Style Giclée Print • Big Grid • 24 x 36″ (Signed)

The Cue Dot • Contact Sheet Style Giclée Print • Set #1 • 18 x 24″ (Signed)

The Cue Dot • Contact Sheet Style Giclée Print • Set #2 • 18 x 24″ (Signed)

Back this Project

The Cue Dot is far from over. 

You can help me unlock the next phase of this project:

Make a $25 contribution to this project by picking up a poster from the online store. Your purchase will help keep The Cue Dot project going, and you’ll have an awesome piece of cinema history to hang on your wall:

Get the Poster!

The 24 x 36″ Poster • Shipping Worldwide

Follow this Project

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The Story Continues…

As this project expands, I look forward to sharing more of this unique history and bringing audiences further into this forgotten world…

The theater I documented was unique, with carbon arc film projectors that dated back to 1938 and remained in use for more than seven decades before the digital conversion.

These machines were wondrous. Thread them with a celluloid ribbon, strike the arc, open the douser, and the stuff of dreams poured out.

Seventy-five years of film history wound their way through these projectors. Films like 2001: A Space Odyssey, The Wizard of Oz, Casablanca, and countless others.

Get in touch:

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